• RE: Question about "weather news"

    Contact @Korina, she will help you with that

    posted in Your Feedback and Suggestions
  • After Canary Islands travel chaos. Copernicus tracks path of dust plume to Western Europe

    ECMWF/CAMS Forecasts of Aerosol Optical Depth for Sunday 23/02 at 1800 UTC (forecast based Sunday 23/02 at 0000 UTC) and for Friday 28/02 at 1500 UTC (forecast based Thursday 27/02 at 0000 UTC)

    After desert dust grounded flights in the Canary Islands, forecasts from the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) can help track where the dust goes next to help both the transport industry and travellers

    A large swathe of desert dust from the Sahara swept across the Canary Islands earlier this week, turning skies red and prompting travel chaos – and also causing extreme levels of particulate matter. The Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service (CAMS) reveals how its forecasts help businesses and individuals plan against its impact. CAMS is implemented by the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts on behalf of the European Commission.

    CAMS is continually monitoring the movement of desert dust over the North Atlantic Ocean and the latest global and regional forecasts of aerosol optical depth and surface particulate matter (PM10) are predicting that it will travel across southern and western Europe in the coming days with impacts on air quality and a number of activity sectors, such as solar power generation across the Iberian peninsula.

    By providing these forecasts of the amount and location of desert dust in the atmosphere, CAMS can help scientists, environmental agencies, energy and transportation companies, businesses and individuals make plans and mitigate its effects. It is not only transportation which can be affected by desert dust incidents, but particles from the plumes, which can often travel thousands of kilometres, can have health impacts.

    Produced twice a day, forecasts take into account the emission, transport and deposition of the dust by combining satellite observations with a state-of-the-art computer model to accurately predict the amount of dust that is generated by surface winds and how the distribution of the resulting plumes will change over the next five days.

    Greater knowledge of dust deposition can help organisations monitor air quality and also susceptible individuals who can change their plans or behaviour, such as not drying clothes outside or parking their car indoor if this is possible for them.

    Vincent-Henri Peuch, Director of the Copernicus Atmosphere Monitoring Service, comments: “As we have seen from the incident affecting flights to and from the Canary Islands, dust particles can not only cause huge disruption, but affect people’s health as well. This is why it’s vital to have accurate forecasts and CAMS not only provide these, but work with companies and organisations which can relay this information to the public through smartphone or tablet apps and websites.”

    “In fact, CAMS delivers forecasts of dust and of other key air pollutants to leading applications providing air quality information to the public such as Windy, BreezoMeter, Plumelabs and iPhone´s weather app powered by The Weather Channel, ” he added.

    posted in Articles
  • Windy Tutorial: What is the difference between the reference time and the update time

    Each model has a different update and reference times and it could be confusing what connection does it have to actual update. Before we get to how often are the weather models updated and where to find the update/reference time on Windy, let's see what's the difference between the reference time and the update time.

    1. Reference time

    Reference time is the time when a model starts a new forecast block. The process consists of the following:

    • Initialisation - data are entered into the model, this creates Initial conditions (initialisation time) and then model starts calculating conditions.
    • Assimilation - normalisation on data and assembling data for computation.
    • Computation - calculating the future atmospheric rates of change in time increments.
    • Data extraction - extracting data into regular forecast intervals.
    • Data storage - data are stored and written in accessible format.
    • Data postprocessing - special postprocessing routines

    For example model ECMWF has an update interval 12 hours, that means the first reference time will be 00:00:00Z (Zulu time) and second one 12:00:00Z.

    2. Update time

    Update time is time between the reference time and the actual update. The whole process of data computation takes approximately from 8 to 9 hours. For example the ECMWF model update times are 07:15:00Z and 19:15:00Z.

    When and how often are the weather data updated?

    The table below describes when and how often are the weather models updated. All times are in UTC.

    photo:Windy.com;desc:Weather models update times; licence:cc

    Where to find the reference and the update time

    While on desktop, to get the reference and the update time, just click the clock icon in bottom right corner of the screen. In app, you have to dig deeper into the menu. See the screenshots below.

    photo:Windy.com;desc:Reference/update time on desktop; licence:cc

    photo:Windy.com;desc:Reference/update time in apps; licence:cc

    posted in Articles
  • RE: Windy Tutorial: Jak dodać kamerę internetową do Windy

    @idefix37 Thanks!

    posted in Articles
  • Windy Tutorial: Jak dodać kamerę internetową do Windy

    🇵🇱 Polish | 🇬🇧 English | 🇫🇷 Français | 🇳🇱 Nederlands

    photo:Windy.com;desc:Sprawdzanie kamery pogodowej; licence:cc;

    Sprawdzanie kamery pogodowej jest niezbędnym elementem każdej przygody.

    A my w Windy jesteśmy zobowiązani do zapewniania coraz lepszych usług osobom takim jak my sami. Dla pilotów, kiterów, poszukiwaczy przygód, alpinistów i wszystkich dusz, które są raczej na zewnątrz niż w centrum handlowym.

    Ale nie tylko. W Windy wierzymy, że sprawdzanie kamer internetowych na zewnątrz przed przygodą, na przykład przed lotem małym samolotem, może znacznie zwiększyć poziom bezpieczeństwa. —Ivo

    Dołącz do społeczności Windy i udostępnij kamerę internetową publiczności na całym świecie. Możesz przesłać swoją kamerę internetową za pomocą tego formularza (kliknij TUTAJ), odpowiadając na kilka prostych pytań.

    photo:Windy.com;desc:Kamery na Windy;licence:cc;

    Windy sprawdzi twoje zgłoszenie, a gdy kamera internetowa zostanie zatwierdzona, otrzymasz powiadomienie o pomyślnym zgłoszeniu. Twoja kamera internetowa zostanie uruchomiona..

    Jeśli zastanawiasz się nad zakupem kamery internetowej lub właśnie kupujesz kamerę internetową, sprawdź poniższą listę obsługiwanych urządzeń.

    Rzeczy do rozważenia przed przesłaniem kamery internetowej do Windy

    • Twój serwer kamery musi mieć adresy IP pochodzące z zewnątrz na białej liście, ponieważ często występują problemy z serwerami blokującymi nasz adres IP domyślnie
    • Przetestujemy twoją kamerę internetową, czy możliwe jest codzienne pobieranie danych, dlatego ważne jest, aby podać nam poprawny adres URL obrazu
    • Zapisujemy tylko zdjęcia, które są publicznie dostępne na naszej stronie internetowej z pokazów slajdów (timelapse)
    • Sama kamera internetowa może mieć kilka widoków. W zależności od tego, co jest pokazane na obrazie kamery, określa się kategorię i tytuł przypisany do każdej kamery internetowej

    Prześlij swoją kamerę internetową

    Lista obsługiwanych urządzeń

    Producenci z Niemiec, Austrii, Szwajcarii i Francji

    Polecane marki

    Oprogramowanie i aplikacje do przesyłania strumieniowego

    desc:Ekrany aplikacji PixWebcam

    Następny krok: dodaj kamerę internetową do ulubionych

    photo:Windy.com;desc:Dodaj kamerę do Twoich ulubionych;licence:cc;

    Poniżej obrazu z kamery internetowej możesz ją ulubić, udostępniając ją w celu szybkiego dostępu (do kamer w ważnych lokalizacjach).

    photo:Windy.com;desc:Kamera internetowa w Twoich ulubionych;licence:cc;

    posted in Articles
  • NASA-NOAA satellite gets an eye-opening look at Tropical Cyclone Ferdinand

    Tropical Cyclone Ferdinand has strengthened and developed an eye, as confirmed in imagery from NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite.

    The Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard Suomi NPP provided a visible image of Ferdinand and showed that an eye opened as the storm continued to intensify. A thick band of powerful bands of thunderstorms circled the eye.

    photo:NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS);

    NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite found that Tropical Cyclone Ferdinand has developed an eye as it continued to strengthen in the Southern Indian Ocean on Feb. 25, 2020.

    On Feb. 25 at 10 a.m. EST (1500 UTC), the Joint Typhoon Warning Center of JTWC noted that Tropical cyclone Ferdinand was located near 15.8 degrees south latitude and 116.5 degrees east longitude, approximately, 413 nautical miles north-northeast of Learmonth, Western Australia.

    Ferdinand was moving to the southwest and maximum sustained winds had increased to 90 knots (104 mph/167 kph). That is the equivalent of a Category 2 hurricane on the Saffir-Simpson hurricane wind scale.

    JTWC forecasts that Ferdinand will move southwest and strengthen slightly more before starting to weaken. The storm is then expected to curve to the northwest through the Southern Indian Ocean.

    Tropical cyclones are the most powerful weather event on Earth. NASA’s expertise in space and scientific exploration contributes to essential services provided to the American people by other federal agencies, such as hurricane weather forecasting.

    Rob Gutro
    NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

    Related content

    https://www.windy.com/-Satellite-satellite?satellite,-17.853,105.381,5,internal

    posted in Articles
  • Canary Islands hit by massive African dust storm

    The weather event known as the "Calima" came to Canary Islands again on Saturday afternoon. Strong winds blowing out of Western Sahara brought massive dust storm to northern Canaries, leading to cancelation of all flights in and out of Gran Canaria and all flights leaving Tenerife, due to severely impacted visibility.

    Gran Canaria, Fuerteventura and Lanzarote are among the most affected locations. To see the extent of the storm, check out the webcams on Windy and the videos shared via Twitter (embeded below).

    The storm is so huge it's visible from space as you can see in the satellite loop from 12 a.m. to 6 p.m. UTC today.

    photo:Windy Webcams;desc:La Quinta, Santa Úrsula, Tenerife

    photo:Windy Webcams;desc:Aeropuerto Tenerife Norte desde el Ortigal

    https://www.windy.com/-Satellite-satellite?satellite,27.868,-17.325,7,internal

    posted in Articles
  • First Satellite in Global Air Quality Constellation Launches

    photo:Courtesy of Arianespace;desc:An Arianespace Ariane 5 rocket;

    An Arianespace Ariane 5 rocket carrying South Korea's Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) instrument launches Tuesday, Feb. 18, from the Guiana Space Center in French Guiana.

    South Korea's Geostationary Environment Monitoring Spectrometer (GEMS) instrument on the Korean Aerospace Research Institute GEO-KOMPSAT-2B satellite launched into orbit aboard an Arianespace Ariane 5 rocket Tuesday, Feb. 18, from the Guiana Space Center in French Guiana.

    A sister instrument to NASA's Tropospheric Emissions: Monitoring of Pollution (TEMPO), GEMS will be the first satellite instrument in a constellation of three satellite instruments that will revolutionize the way scientists observe air quality over significant swaths of the Northern Hemisphere. GEMS will monitor atmospheric gases over Asia hourly during daytime from a geostationary, or fixed, orbit over the equator. This marks a significant leap forward in scientists' ability to monitor air pollution from space.

    GEMS is nearly identical to TEMPO, which is scheduled to launch into geostationary orbit in 2022 as a payload on Intelsat 40e. TEMPO will make hourly daytime measurements of air quality over North America. Both GEMS and TEMPO were built by Ball Aerospace in Boulder, Colorado. The European Space Agency's Sentinel-4, currently in development, will observe air quality over Europe.

    All three instruments will provide data products that will improve scientists' ability to understand and forecast air quality around the Northern Hemisphere.

    Last Updated: Feb. 20, 2020
    Editor: Joe Atkinson

    https://www.windy.com/-Satellite-satellite?satellite,31.803,-71.543,3,internal

    posted in Articles
  • Satellite Imagery: NASA sees Tropical Cyclone 18P form near American Samoa

    The low-pressure area that has been lingering west-northwest of American Samoa for several days has organized into a tropical depression. NASA’s Terra satellite passed over the Southern Pacific Ocean and provided forecasters with a visible image of Tropical Depression 18P.

    photo:NASA Worldview;desc:Terra image of 18P

    On Feb. 21, 2020, the MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Terra satellite provided a visible image of newly developed Tropical Depression 18P in the Southern Pacific Ocean.

    On Feb.21, the Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Terra satellite provided a visible image of 18P that showed an improved cyclonic circulation along the southern end of a line of deep convection and thunderstorms that extends north-to-south.

    At 10 a.m. EST (1500 UTC) on Feb. 21, the Joint Typhoon Warning Center said Tropical Cyclone 18P had maximum sustained winds near 30 knots (34.5 mph/55.5 kph). It was located near latitude 12.9 degrees south and longitude 174.8 degrees west, about 280 nautical miles west-northwest of Pago Pago, American Samoa. 18P is moving to the east-southeast.

    The tropical cyclone is forecast to intensify to a tropical storm reaching maximum sustained winds to 45 knots as it passes near American Samoa on Feb. 22. In three days, vertical wind shear is expected to kick in which will cause the storm to dissipate quickly.

    In addition to Tropical Cyclone 18P, Tropical Storm Vicky has developed to the southeast of American Samoa. Together, these systems have generated several warnings and watches. On Feb. 21, the National Weather Service (NWS) in Pago Pago has continued the Flash Flood Watch for all of American Samoa through Saturday, Feb. 22.

    The NWS forecast page stated, “The active monsoon trough remains across the area with several hybrid lows developing northwest and moving swiftly across the islands through the week. A flash flood watch means that conditions may develop that lead to flash flooding. Flash flooding is a very dangerous situation.”

    NASA’s Terra satellite is one in a fleet of NASA satellites that provide data for hurricane research.

    Tropical cyclones/hurricanes are the most powerful weather events on Earth. NASA’s expertise in space and scientific exploration contributes to essential services provided to the American people by other federal agencies, such as hurricane weather forecasting.

    For updated forecasts from NWS, Pago Pago, visit: https://www.weather.gov/ppg/?lang=english

    Rob Gutro
    NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

    Related content

    https://www.windy.com/-Satellite-satellite?satellite,-22.513,170.640,4,internal

    posted in Articles
  • Rainfall Rates in two American Samoa Tropical Cyclones, 18P and Tropical Storm Vicky

    There are two tropical cyclones affecting American Samoa in the South Pacific Ocean on Feb. 21. Tropical Storm Vicky has triggered warnings, while Tropical Cyclone 18P continues to develop. The Global Precipitation Measurement mission or GPM satellite provided a look at the rainfall rates occurring in both storms.

    photo:NASA/NRL;desc:GPM image of Vicky

    The GPM’s core satellite passed over the South Pacific Ocean on Feb. 20 at 10:20 p.m. EDT (0220 UTC, Feb. 21). GPM found heaviest rainfall (orange) occurring in both Tropical Cyclone 18P and Tropical Storm Vicky, falling at rates of 1 inch (25 mm) per hour. Light rain appears around those heavier rainfall areas and throughout the rest of the tropical cyclones (light blue), falling at less than 0.2 inches (less than 5 millimeters) per hour.

    Vicky is located to the southeast of American Samoa and 18P is located to the northwest. American Samoa is a U.S. territory covering seven islands and atolls. The capital city of Pago Pago is located on Tutuila, the largest island.

    The National Weather Service (NWS) in Pago Pago issued a Tropical Storm Warning on Feb. 21 for American Samoa, and coastal waters out to 40 nautical miles including National Marine Sanctuary of American Samoa.

    In addition, a High Surf Warning remains in effect that states, “Hazardous surfs of at least 20 feet, with locally higher sets, will impact coastal waters, especially west through south facing shores of all islands due to the intensification of Tropical Storm Vicky south of the islands.” A Flash Flood Watch is also in effect for all of American Samoa.

    The GPM’s core satellite passed over the South Pacific Ocean on Feb. 20 at 10:20 p.m. EDT (0220 UTC, Feb. 21). GPM found heaviest rainfall occurring in both Tropical Cyclone 18P and Tropical Storm Vicky, falling at rates of 1 inch (25 mm) per hour. Light rain appeared around those areas and throughout the rest of the tropical cyclones, falling at less than 0.2 inches (less than 5 millimeters) per hour.

    On Feb. 21 at 4 a.m. EST (0900 UTC), Vicky was located near latitude 15.7 degrees south and longitude 170.7 degrees west, about 84 nautical miles south of Pago Pago, American Samoa. Vicky was moving to the south and had maximum sustained winds 40 knots (46 mph/74 kph).

    Vicky is gradually weakening and the Joint Typhoon Warning Center expects it to weaken below tropical cyclone strength before passing near Niue within 24 hours.

    Tropical cyclones/hurricanes are the most powerful weather events on Earth. NASA’s expertise in space and scientific exploration contributes to essential services provided to the American people by other federal agencies, such as hurricane weather forecasting.

    GPM is a joint mission between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency, JAXA.

    For updated forecasts from the NWS in Pago Pago, visit www.weather.gov/ppg

    Rob Gutro
    NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

    Related content

    https://www.windy.com/-Satellite-satellite?satellite,-22.513,170.640,4,internal

    posted in Articles