• RE: Plugins not working on mobiles/pads: what's the definitive word?

    I would love to see plugin on mobile app & web too !

    posted in Windy Plugins
  • RE: Your map uploads

    Tropical Storm Perla (21W) Warning 5

    https://www.windy.com/upload/5da8b69e1f1c1e001a3f394f

    _center_shadow


    Upload your own KML, GPX, GeoJSON file at https://www.windy.com/uploader

    posted in General Discussion
  • RE: waves notifcations posted in Your Feedback and Suggestions
  • RE: More customization

    Customization is pretty hard to get right... Too much options tend to render apps and services complicated and unusable, which doesn't mean (as I believe) the Windy devs aren't open to add more options if it makes sense.

    Good idea to start this thread, to let the Windy devs find out, what kind of customizations are in greatest demand. I am sure they would implement anything that 10 % of users would find useful.

    So folks, what are your suggestions when it comes to custom options?

    posted in Your Feedback and Suggestions
  • A textbook squall line over the Carolinas

    ESA astronaut Luca Parmitano captured this image of the US East Coast from the International Space Station and shared it on his social media channels saying: "A textbook squall line over the Carolinas."

    photo:Luca Parmitano;decs:Una perfetta linea di fronte sopra le Carolinas'

    Luca was launched to the International Space Station for his second mission, Beyond, on 20 July 2019. He will spend six months living and working on the orbital outpost where he will support more than 50 European experiments and more than 200 international experiments in space.

    Follow Luca and his Beyond mission on Twitter or Facebook on his website and on his blog.

    https://www.windy.com/-Satellite-satellite?satellite,32.463,-83.562,6,internal

    posted in Articles
  • Satellite Imagery: Atlantic Subtropical Storm Melissa Form off New England Coast

    Satellite data has confirmed the formation of Subtropical Storm Melissa. NASA’s Terra Satellite provided a visible image the former Nor’easter turned subtropical storm off the coast of New England.

    The National Hurricane Center or NHC noted that the Nor’easter centered southeast of New England (in the northeastern U.S.) becomes a subtropical storm, and that the change in storm status does not change expected impacts from wind and coastal flooding along portions of the mid-Atlantic coast and Southeastern New England.

    On Oct. 11, the Moderate Imaging Spectroradiometer or MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Terra satellite provided a visible image of the newly developed Melissa.

    Forecasters at the National Hurricane Center noted on Oct.11 at 11 a.m. EDT, “Convection increased near the center of the nor’easter centered southeast of New England overnight. First-light visible satellite imagery briefly showed an eye-like feature before the convection around the immediate center began to weaken. However, a large convective band still persists over the northern semicircle, and this structure indicated the system has transitioned to a subtropical cyclone.”

    photo:NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS);desc:On Oct. 11, the MODIS instrument that flies aboard NASA’s Terra provided a visible image of Subtropical Storm Melissa off the New England coast.

    At 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC), on Oct. 11, the center of Subtropical Storm Melissa was located near latitude 38.5 degrees North and longitude degrees 69.6 West. That is about 190 miles (300 km) south of Nantucket, Massachusetts.

    Melissa is moving toward the south-southwest near 3 mph (6 kph), but little net motion is expected today. A turn toward the east-northeast with an increase in forward speed is forecast tonight and this motion will continue through the weekend.

    On the forecast track, the center of Melissa will move away from the east coast of the United States.

    Maximum sustained winds are near 65 mph (100 kph) with higher gusts. Gradual weakening is expected over the next couple of days, and Melissa is forecast to lose its subtropical characteristics by Saturday night.

    Winds of 40 mph extend outward up to 345 miles (555 km) from the center, primarily over waters. The estimated minimum central pressure is 995 millibars.

    Hurricanes are the most powerful weather event on Earth. NASA’s expertise in space and scientific exploration contributes to essential services provided to the American people by other federal agencies, such as hurricane weather forecasting.

    For updated forecasts, visit www.nhc.noaa.gov

    Rob Gutro
    NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, Md.

    https://www.windy.com/-Satellite-satellite?satellite,34.832,-75.322,5,internal

    posted in Articles
  • RE: Your map uploads

    Typhoon Hagibis Warning 31 (Final)

    https://www.windy.com/upload/5da247d4a81ce10019a1e6ce

    _center_shadow


    Upload your own KML, GPX, GeoJSON file at https://www.windy.com/uploader

    posted in General Discussion
  • Satellite Imagery: Super Typhoon Hagibis captured by Copernicus Sentinel-3

    Typhoon Hagibis is headed towards Japan’s main island of Honshu, where it is expected to make landfall over the weekend. Japan is bracing for potential damage from strong winds and torrential rain.

    This enormous typhoon, which is being compared to a Category 5 hurricane, can be seen in this image captured by the Copernicus Sentinel-3 mission on 10 October at 01:00 GMT (10:00 Japan Standard Time). The eye of the storm has a diameter of approximately 60 km.

    photo:Copernicus/ESA;desc:Super Typhoon Hagibis on 10 October at 1 a.m. GMT (10 a.m. JST). Contains modified Copernicus Sentinel data (2019), processed by ESA

    https://www.windy.com/-Satellite-satellite?satellite,22.095,131.099,4,internal

    posted in Articles
  • Satellite Imagery: Supertyphoon Hagibis over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean

    NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over the Northwestern Pacific Ocean and used infrared light to obtain temperature information about Supertyphoon Hagibis’ cold cloud tops, painting a picture of a super-strong storm.

    NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite used infrared light to analyze the strength of storms within the structure of Hagibis. Infrared data provides temperature information, and the strongest thunderstorms that reach high into the atmosphere have the coldest cloud top temperatures. This data is helpful to forecasters because storms are not uniform around tropical cyclones and it helps pinpoint where the strongest storms are located.

    photo:NASA/NOAA/UWM-CIMSS, William Straka III;desc: NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over Supertyphoon Hagibis and the VIIRS instrument aboard captured this image of the storm on Oct. 7 at 12.15 pm. EDT (1615 UTC). Suomi NPP found strongest thunderstorms around the center had cloud top temperatures as cold as 190 Kelvin (gray) or minus 117 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 83.1 Celsius)

    Just before Suomi NPP passed over Hagibis, at 1:09 p.m. EDT (1509 UTC) Super Typhoon Hagibis passed just to the south of the island of Anatahan. The Joint Typhoon Warning Center or JTWC noted at 11 a.m. EDT (1500 UTC), that Hagibis had winds of around 140 knots, which would make it a Super Typhoon or the equivalent of a Category 5 storm.

    Oct. 7 at 12:15 pm. EDT (1615 UTC) the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard Suomi NPP found strongest thunderstorms circling Hagibis’ center had cloud top temperatures as cold as 190 Kelvin or minus 117 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 83.1 Celsius). NASA research has shown that cloud top temperatures that cold indicate strong storms have the potential to generate heavy rainfall.

    photo:NASA/NOAA/UWM-CIMSS, William Straka III;desc: NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite passed over Supertyphoon Hagibis and the VIIRS instrument aboard captured this close up image of the storm on Oct. 7 at 12:15 pm. EDT (1615 UTC). Suomi NPP found strongest thunderstorms around the center had cloud top temperatures as cold as 190 Kelvin (gray) or minus 117 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 83.1 Celsius)

    On Oct. 8 at 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC), a Typhoon Warning remains in effect for Alamagan and Pagan Islands in the CNMI. Damaging winds of 39 to 50 mph will continue through at least late this evening. A Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for Agrihan Island. Tropical storm conditions, including damaging winds of 39 to 50 mph, are expected through this evening.

    At 10 p.m. CHST (8 a.m. EDT or 1200 UTC) the National Weather Service office in Tiyan, Guam noted that the center of Super Typhoon Hagibis was located near Latitude 18.5 degrees North and Longitude 141.8 degrees East.

    Hagibis is moving northwest at 15 mph. It is expected to maintain this general course with a decrease in forward speed during the next 24 hours. Maximum sustained winds remain at 155 mph. Hagibis is forecast to maintain this intensity through Wednesday then begin a gradual weakening trend.

    Typhoon force winds extend outward from the center up to 85 miles. Tropical storm force winds extend outward from the center up to 300 miles to the northeast and up to 240 miles elsewhere.

    Hagibis is moving northwest. The system will turn to the north as it goes through a weakening trend on approach to Japan.

    Hurricanes are the most powerful weather event on Earth. NASA’s expertise in space and scientific exploration contributes to essential services provided to the American people by other federal agencies, such as hurricane weather forecasting.

    Oct. 7, 2019 – NASA Examines Super Typhoon Hagibis, Warnings in Guam, Micronesia

    Super typhoon Hagibis formed quickly over the weekend of Oct. 5 and 6. NASA’s Aqua satellite passed over the storm after it achieved super typhoon status on Oct. 6 found extremely cold cloud top temperatures, indicating very powerful storms with heavy rainfall potential. Warnings are in effect in Guam and throughout the Federated States of Micronesia on Oct. 7.

    One of the ways NASA researches tropical cyclones is using infrared data that provides temperature information. The AIRS instrument aboard NASA’s Aqua satellite captured a look at those temperatures in Super Typhoon Hagibis and gave insight into the storm’s rainfall potential near Guam.

    photo:NASA JPL/Heidar Thrastarson;desc: On Oct 6 at 3:53 p.m. EDT (1553 UTC) NASA’s Aqua satellite analyzed Hagibis when it was a tropical storm using the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument. AIRS found coldest cloud top temperatures as cold as or colder than (purple) minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 53 degrees Celsius) around the center and in a thick band of thunderstorms east and west of center.

    Cloud top temperatures provide information to forecasters about where the strongest storms are located within a tropical cyclone. Tropical cyclones do not always have uniform strength, and some sides have stronger sides than others.

    The stronger the storms, the higher they extend into the troposphere, and they have the colder cloud temperatures. NASA provides data to forecasters at NOAA’s National Hurricane Center or NHC so they can incorporate in their forecasting. Those data went into the forecasts from the National Weather Service office in Tiyan, Guam on Oct. 7.

    Oct. 6 at 3:53 p.m. EDT (1553 UTC) NASA’s Aqua satellite analyzed the storm using the Atmospheric Infrared Sounder or AIRS instrument when Hagibis was a tropical storm and strengthening quickly. When Aqua passed overhead, Hagibis had maximum sustained winds near 50 knots (57 mph/93 kph).

    AIRS found coldest cloud top temperatures as cold as or colder than minus 63 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 53 degrees Celsius) around Super Typhoon Hagibis’ center and in thick bands of thunderstorms west and east of center. Those cloud top temperatures continued to drop as Hagibis strengthened from a tropical storm into a typhoon.

    NASA research has shown that cloud top temperatures that cold indicate strong storms that have the capability to create heavy rain.

    photo:NASA Worldview, Earth Observing System Data and Information System (EOSDIS);desc: NASA-NOAA’s Suomi NPP satellite captured this visible image of Super typhoon Hagibis on Oct. 7 affecting both Guam and the Federated States of Micronesia. It showed a well-defined eye covered by high clouds, surrounded by powerful thunderstorms. A thick, powerful band of thunderstorms was wrapping into the low-level center from the southwest, and a large band of thunderstorms stretched around the eastern quadrant and extended far south of the storm.

    Hagibis reached super typhoon status on Oct. 7 by 5 a.m. EDT (0900 UTC). After that time, the Visible Infrared Imaging Radiometer Suite (VIIRS) instrument aboard Suomi NPP provided a visible image of Super typhoon Hagibis.

    It showed a well-defined eye covered by high clouds, surrounded by powerful thunderstorms. A thick, powerful band of thunderstorms was wrapping into the low-level center from the southwest, and a large band of thunderstorms stretched around the eastern quadrant and extended far south of the storm. The storm was affecting both Guam and the Federated States of Micronesia.

    A Typhoon Warning remains in effect for Saipan, Tinian, Alamagan and Pagan Islands in the CNMI. Typhoon conditions, including destructive winds of 74 mph or more, will continue through Tuesday morning.

    A Tropical Storm Warning remains in effect for Guam, Rota and Agrihan Islands. Tropical storm conditions, including damaging winds of 39 to 73 mph, are expected through Tuesday morning. A Flash Flood Warning is in effect for Rota, Tinian and Saipan.

    At 8 a.m. EDT (1200 UTC), the NWS of Guam noted the center of Super typhoon Hagibis was located by satellite near Latitude 16.1 degrees North and Longitude 146.7 degrees East. That is about 70 miles east-southeast of Anatahan and about 95 miles northeast of Saipan.

    Hagibis is moving west-northwest at 15 mph and is expected to maintain this general course and speed through Tuesday. Hagibis is expected to pass over Anatahan later tonight. Maximum sustained winds remain at 150 mph. Hagibis is forecast to intensify further through Tuesday, possibly reaching peak intensity Tuesday evening, Oct. 8.

    The AIRS instrument is one of six instruments flying on board NASA’s Aqua satellite, launched on May 4, 2002.

    Hurricanes are the most powerful weather event on Earth. NASA’s expertise in space and scientific exploration contributes to essential services provided to the American people by other federal agencies, such as hurricane weather forecasting.

    For updated forecasts, visit www.weather.gov/gum/

    Rob Gutro
    NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center

    https://www.windy.com/-Satellite-satellite?satellite,8.711,134.297,4,internal

    posted in Articles
  • RE: Your map uploads

    Typhoon Hagibis Warning 11 (JTWC)

    https://www.windy.com/upload/5d9bb6dffbd0ee0019eecef0

    _center_shadow


    Upload your own KML, GPX, GeoJSON file at https://www.windy.com/uploader

    posted in General Discussion