Clouds



  • Is there any chance of a definition of low medium and high clouds?



  • In general (in middle latitudes):
    Low clouds are those with cloud bases up to 7.000ft.
    High clouds have bases from 18.000 ft.
    Medium clouds range from 7.000 to 18.000ft.

    Because the thickness of the troposphere (were the weather phenomena occur) ranges from 22.000 ft (poles) to 60.000ft (tropics), the definition of low, middle and high clouds vary from country to country.

    Weather models usually use the above mentioned catigorization.

    Also see http://www.metoffice.gov.uk/learning/clouds



  • @Gkikas-LGPZ This is not the definitions used by Windy. See: https://community.windy.com/topic/3361/description-of-weather-overlays

    "High clouds: High clouds is cloud coverage at an altitude between circa 6500m and the cloud tops. Cloud cover is given in percent.

    Medium clouds: Medium clouds is cloud coverage at an altitude between circa 2000m and circa 6500m. Cloud cover is given in percent.

    Low clouds: Low clouds is cloud coverage at an altitude between the surface and circa 2000m. Cloud cover is given in percent."



  • @masonleandro
    The definitions I gave (2,5 years ago) come from UK's Metoffice as I mention.
    I never said that this is the definition used by Windy.
    In any case, I think there is no contradiction.
    7000 ft = 2135m (circa 2000m) and 18000 ft = 5500 m.

    For more precise definitions (for ECMWF model)
    "... cloud layers are assigned as:
    High-level cloud cover (HCC). - Cloud integrated from top of the atmosphere down to 450hPa*.
    Medium-level cloud cover (MCC). - Cloud integrated from 450hPa* down to 800hPa*.
    Low-level cloud cover (LCC). - Cloud integrated from 800hPa* down to the surface.

    source: https://confluence.ecmwf.int/display/FUG/Clouds



  • This post is deleted!


  • @Gkikas-LGPZ
    When searching for the definition of low, medium, and high clouds on Windy, this is the first thread that appears. I just did not want anyone to make the same mistake that I did in taking the definition you provided as Windy's definition (even though you didn't explicitly state that it was) and simply wanted to direct other users to the definitions provided by Windy.


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