Aurora



  • Hi windy. First off what a great app. What is the possibility of including a layer to forcast the possibility of seeing the aurora. Having a tool like that would allow us that are not normally in a high enough region to see them have the potential if the aurora become strong enough to get into lower longitudes. Thanks



  • @skippy13
    To see the aurora, first of all, you need clear skies (no clouds).
    So, you must start from here:
    https://www.windy.com/?clouds,61.648,-45.703,3,a:FFMFF

    After then, you must know if the solar activity (solar wind)
    is adequate for aurora.
    For short term (1 hr) aurora forecast, see:
    http://www.aurora-service.eu/aurora-forecast/



  • example:
    0_1517391893853_e11a194f-7ea5-459a-a294-22374631586b-εικόνα.png

    observers in Canada, can not see aurora, because of clouds.
    observers in Alaska have a 30 to 50% probability
    (check the scale at second image).



  • That's exactly it. And also take into account location altitude and cloud cover


  • Photographer

    Predicting Aurora i think most Aurora Hunters know how to do and what it involves... there are plenty of tools on the web to predict.
    What we need is an aurora oval overlay on a map, no matter the clouds. So we know more exactly where to go. This is an essential tool for Aurora spotting in northern Europe since the Aurora oval is not consistent and changes quite drastically dependent on the weather conditions in space, earth's magnetic field and the intensity overall. In northern Europe it is quite closely monitored in the northern countries.
    Seeing the Aurora oval is most likely the most significant and essential tool in forecasting the Northern Lights. NOAA has provided data for years but has proven the last couple of years to be more and more un reliable and faulty by as much as two days + -.


 

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